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Yellow Fever -- Epidemiology -- Pennsylvania

 Subject
Subject Source: Medical Subject Headings

Found in 64 Collections and/or Records:

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 18

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush describes how he has been forced to limit the number of patients he sees, and the reactions of those whose treatment he declines. He also describes how many of those who become infected are abandoned. He mentions that there is fear of famine in the city.
Dates: 1793 September 18

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 20

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush says that distress increases in Philadelphia, and names several friends and one doctor who have died.
Dates: 1793 September 20

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 21

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that he is well, but has a sore throat from his treatment. He saw 25 patients by carriage; then 25 more, mostly poor people, at home, but was still forced to turn away 38 others. Their house continues as a hospital. He says that his professional detractors are increasing their persecution of him.
Dates: 1793 September 21

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 22-23

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush enumerates the close family friends that are ill or have died, and notes that only one doctor who continues to follow his treatment.
Dates: 1793 September 22-23

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 23-24

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that his pupil, Johnny Stall, has died. He mentions that citizens universally exhibit symptoms of the fever, but that the poor suffer the most. He hopes the weather will change.
Dates: 1793 September 23-24

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 24

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that another of his assistants, Alston, has died. He admits to extreme weakness, but otherwise is in good health. He points out that bleeders, doctors, apothecaries, and nurses are becoming scarce, as are the medical necessities used to treat the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 24

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 25-26

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush says he has been spending time treating and putting up medicines for the poor. He hopes rain and frost will follow to weaken the contagion. He points out that many have died because they mistake their symptoms for a common fever. He notes that now even the African Americans are succumbing in large numbers.
Dates: 1793 September 25-26

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 26-27

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that his final apprentice, John Coxe, has died and that his sister is very ill. There is some rain in the city. He reports that Dr. Wistar has published an account of his recovery that is calculated to undermine Rush's treatments.
Dates: 1793 September 26-27

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 29-30

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush reports that his sister is in grave danger and that, by popular demand, physicians have been forced to adopt his treatment for the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 29-30

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 30 - October 1

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush defends his taking in Johnny Stall and Ed Fisher, as neither had any other home. His sister, who was at the brink of death, is better, but his mother is now ill and is refusing treatment.
Dates: 1793 September 30 - October 1