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Yellow Fever -- Epidemiology -- Pennsylvania

 Subject
Subject Source: Medical Subject Headings

Found in 64 Collections and/or Records:

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 5

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush writes that he has seen 100 patients, and that he now saves almost all those he sees within the first day. He notes that some doctors rail against the cure he uses, several of them publishing false information, even though they generally have not visited patients with the fever. He chronicles the fate of several doctors that have contracted the disease. He notes that some of his friends are ashamed to see him once they fall ill. He admonishes her once more to watch the boys closely for...
Dates: 1793 September 5

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 6-7

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush notes that his cure is working, but there is a pause in new cases, and that fatalities are now among the poor without access to doctors or respectable people being treated by quacks. He states that if the fever breaks out in Princeton, he will send his assistant John Cox to execute his cure. Once again he documents the health status of his fellow physicians, although he records a rumor that some doctors have ceased seeing patients at all. He then discusses the various treatments that have...
Dates: 1793 September 6-7

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 8

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush tells Julia that the pause is over; he has been called to countless cases. Two more doctors are ill, Dr. Morris has died, and Secretary Hamilton is sick. He describes the support he receives from friends, along with the more serious symptoms of the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 8

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 10

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush expresses amazement that he remains uninfected by the fever, for he has seen over 100 patients on this date, and 40 people were buried. He states that he does not forget to treat the poor "remembering my dream in the Autumn of 1780." Many doctors have adopted his treatment, but several oppose it, as they oppose his treatment for lockjaw. He remarks that more of the French exiles have come down with the fever. He is now using bloodletting as a tool, since the weather is cooler.
Dates: 1793 September 10

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 11

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush notes that the efficacy of his cures is now proven, and that his directions for treating and preventing the disease will be published in the newspapers. He adds that he is in surprisingly good health, since his meals now consist only of milk and vegetables, and water.
Dates: 1793 September 11

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 12

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush writes that he is preparing for the "awful duties of the day," as yesterday exceeded any of the preceding days in distress and death, and two more physicians are ill.
Dates: 1793 September 12

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 13

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush notes that the fever has been said to become more mild, but that is not the case, especially if his treatment has not been used. He adds that besides combatting the fever, he has to contend with the "prejudices, fears, & falsehoods" of his fellow physicians. He adds that all are tinged with infection, now. Even his own eyes are tinged a yellow color.
Dates: 1793 September 13

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 15

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush refers to the tremendous opposition fellow physicians have given him regarding his cures, and Dr. Kuhn's publications have done the most harm. Rush announces that he has used his methods to cure his own attack of the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 15

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 17

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush states that he is sending his assistants out to his patients, and will now visit the most serious cases. He updates her on those in the neighborhood who have not survived.
Dates: 1793 September 17

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 18

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush seeks to reassure his wife that he is fully recovered and well cared for. He notes the numbers of those who oppose his treatments that have now left the city. He adds that it is cold, and that he hopes this will check the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 18