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Yellow Fever -- Epidemiology -- Pennsylvania

 Subject
Subject Source: Medical Subject Headings

Found in 64 Collections and/or Records:

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 31

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush points out that many people are returning to town; he hopes not too soon, for there are still many who are ill or dying. The rest of the letter is regarding his professional feud with Dr. Wistar over treatment for the fever. Rush is especially offended because Wistar had originally assented to the efficacy of Rush's treatment, then changed his mind.
Dates: 1793 October 31

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 November 1

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 2
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush has discovered that a letter containing charges against him has been circulating among physicians. He plans to obtain a copy and publish it. He is inquiring after a house.
Dates: 1793 November 1

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 November 7

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 2
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush challenges Julia to be patient regarding a return to town. He repeats the history of his relationship with his detractors, then returns to praising her as a "great woman" for never asking him to leave the city during the outbreak.
Dates: 1793 November 7

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 November 8

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 2
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush reports having received various letters and items from London, including a medical book. He states that he has had no cases of yellow fever in two days. He uses the rest of the letter to recount fully his second attack of the fever, beginning October 10th. He writes that he expects her return the coming week.
Dates: 1793 November 8

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 November 11

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 2
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush outlines the work that will keep him from visiting Julia, after all. He points out that there have been four deaths from fever, so unless there is a frost, she should not return to Philadelphia on the date they agreed upon. He repeats more of the "slander" against him.
Dates: 1793 November 11

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1798 August 6

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 3
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that yellow fever has broken out throughout the city, but there have been no measures yet to exterminate the disease. Their son Richard plans to move a mattress and books to their farm. Rush notes that a Mr. Thomas has left Philadelphia forever as a result of his debts, and has ruined many young men in the meantime. In a postscript, Rush points out that Capt. Mitchell of the American Army has the fever. Rush is considering leaving and is urging his patients to leave. Rush's...
Dates: 1798 August 6

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1798 August 7-8

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 3
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush notes that the fever has increased more in one week than it had in three weeks in 1793 and 1797. He had made plans to leave in 7-10 days when the U. S. Mint was closed, but by the end of the letter announces more immediate plans to remove to Sydenham, which has been prepared for the family and servants. Their son John is arriving via his ship in New Castle. A note was appended to the letter in 1848, saying that the close of the letter was cut out for an autograph seeker.
Dates: 1798 August 7-8

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1798 August 26

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 3
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush points out that though staying in the country helps him forget all that is going on around him, he cannot forget the poor, sick, and dying in the city. Three more persons were admitted to the hospital this day than were admitted in 1793.
Dates: 1798 August 26

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 August 21

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that a violent "fever" has broken out in one district of the city, where 12 people have died. If it spreads he plans to have Julia remain at Princeton. He then reports that influenza continues to spread, with violent symptoms that cause him anxiety. He adds that Mr. Wolstonecraft has refused to purchase their property, because he could not support himself by hunting on it. Finally, he notes the arrival of a fellow physician's son from France, who brings disturbing news of the...
Dates: 1793 August 21

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 3

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush records that his case load is increasing, as is his fatigue, but that many of those he treats are out of danger. He reports on the progress of the epidemic in their neighborhood.
Dates: 1793 September 3