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Yellow Fever -- Epidemiology -- Pennsylvania

 Subject
Subject Source: Medical Subject Headings

Found in 64 Collections and/or Records:

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 10-11

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush reports mortality is very great, and chiefly among the poor and servants. He adds that nearly 2000 people have died since the beginning of the fever. His own fever has returned and confined him to his house.
Dates: 1793 October 10-11

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 11

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush is confined to his house, and has been prescribing based on the reports of his pupils. He remains weak, but otherwise healthy. He finds it strange when men write to propose business or contractual dealings at this point in time. Part of the final page of the letter is missing.
Dates: 1793 October 11

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 14-15

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush points out that he has received no letters from Julia. He gains strength but must eat often to avoid becoming "weak and fainty." His patients now hand him a glass of milk or crust of bread as they would hand another a glass of wine. He adds that their servant, Marcus, has been very faithful and that his mother is well, but complains of the high cost of housekeeping.
Dates: 1793 October 14-15

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 17-18

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush lists those in the neighborhood who were not his patients that have died. He praises their "black friend," Marcus, for faithfully waiting on him. He has received letters from Europe, among them a letter from Granville Sharp, authorizing him to draw on contributions in London for the African Church of Philadelphia. Among the contributors was the Duke of Grafton. Rush points out that no doctors have inquired after his health, and that their confederacy against him in stronger than ever. The...
Dates: 1793 October 17-18

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 18

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that Dr. Sproat has died, adding, "It is truly distressing to think of the desolation which has followed the footsteps of this man, and of all the Doctors who use Bark- Wine- Laudanum, and hot, or cold Baths in this disorder. It is much more inflammatory than a common Pleurisy, & who ever thought of using those remedies in that disease?" He notes the health of other doctors, and reports that he is now employed again by Mr. Hammond, who had been persuaded against Rush's...
Dates: 1793 October 18

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 20-21

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush details several patients' responses to treatment, or lack thereof, and includes consideration of the impact of psychological influences on recovery. He notes that the days grow colder, but they need rain. He has returned to his notes on yellow fever taken during his apprenticeship in 1762.
Dates: 1793 October 20-21

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 27-28

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces he is contemplating moving into a new house before her return and considers a few locations. He adds that his day no grave was opened in the Quaker graveyard and their were no admissions or deaths in the Bush Hill hospital.
Dates: 1793 October 27-28

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 28-29

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush has taken measures to purify their house. He points to a new clamor regarding his assertion that yellow fever has been operating in the city. He has been asked to prove that assertion.
Dates: 1793 October 28-29

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 29-30

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush records a visit from physicians who have quietly sought to prove the effectiveness of his mercury treatment by using it to treat the poor. He asks Julia to join him in reading Psalm 103 and praising God for his protection. He expects to take charge of the hospital shortly.
Dates: 1793 October 29-30

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 October 30-31

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush notes the health of several doctors and points out that St. Paul's Church has offered prayers twice a week since the fever began. He is not seeing patients, but is spending his time reading and making notes on the epidemic. He describes his melancholy when he contemplates the state of the city and those he has lost.
Dates: 1793 October 30-31