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Yellow Fever -- Epidemiology -- Pennsylvania

 Subject
Subject Source: Medical Subject Headings

Found in 64 Collections and/or Records:

Benjamin Rush (n.p.) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1798 September 27

 Item
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush reports that despite being exposed to the fever daily for two months, he is still healthy. However, he has "felt, mourned, and wept" until he could no longer do so. He reports that poor people chase him down in the street, and that he carries medicine with him in order to do all he can to help them. Free blacks and servants form a large percentage of his patients.
Dates: 1798 September 27

Benjamin Rush (n.p.) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1798 or 1799

 Item
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush writes that deaths from fever are decreasing, and he will soon end his engagement with city hospital. He outlines activities in the family, and their preparations for her return the following week. The signature to this letter has been excised.
Dates: 1798 or 1799

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (n. p.), 1793 October 13-14

 Item
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush informs Julia that he has been thinking more of the children than he has in weeks and describes a dream he has had about her. He inquires after the new baby. He plans to ride out to the countryside to repair his health and later reports feeling stronger. He lists the conditions of those among their acquaintances.
Dates: 1793 October 13-14

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 22-23

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush enumerates the close family friends that are ill or have died, and notes that only one doctor who continues to follow his treatment.
Dates: 1793 September 22-23

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 23-24

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that his pupil, Johnny Stall, has died. He mentions that citizens universally exhibit symptoms of the fever, but that the poor suffer the most. He hopes the weather will change.
Dates: 1793 September 23-24

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 24

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that another of his assistants, Alston, has died. He admits to extreme weakness, but otherwise is in good health. He points out that bleeders, doctors, apothecaries, and nurses are becoming scarce, as are the medical necessities used to treat the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 24

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 25-26

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush says he has been spending time treating and putting up medicines for the poor. He hopes rain and frost will follow to weaken the contagion. He points out that many have died because they mistake their symptoms for a common fever. He notes that now even the African Americans are succumbing in large numbers.
Dates: 1793 September 25-26

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 26-27

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that his final apprentice, John Coxe, has died and that his sister is very ill. There is some rain in the city. He reports that Dr. Wistar has published an account of his recovery that is calculated to undermine Rush's treatments.
Dates: 1793 September 26-27

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 29-30

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush reports that his sister is in grave danger and that, by popular demand, physicians have been forced to adopt his treatment for the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 29-30

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 30 - October 1

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush defends his taking in Johnny Stall and Ed Fisher, as neither had any other home. His sister, who was at the brink of death, is better, but his mother is now ill and is refusing treatment.
Dates: 1793 September 30 - October 1