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Yellow Fever -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 65 Collections and/or Records:

Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers

 Collection
Identifier: RL.11044
Overview The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from...
Dates: Majority of material found within 1766-1845 and undated

Benjamin Rush (n.p.) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1798 September 27

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 3
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush reports that despite being exposed to the fever daily for two months, he is still healthy. However, he has "felt, mourned, and wept" until he could no longer do so. He reports that poor people chase him down in the street, and that he carries medicine with him in order to do all he can to help them. Free blacks and servants form a large percentage of his patients.
Dates: 1798 September 27

Benjamin Rush (n.p.) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1798 or 1799

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 3
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush writes that deaths from fever are decreasing, and he will soon end his engagement with city hospital. He outlines activities in the family, and their preparations for her return the following week. The signature to this letter has been excised.
Dates: 1798 or 1799

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (n. p.), 1793 October 13-14

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 1
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush informs Julia that he has been thinking more of the children than he has in weeks and describes a dream he has had about her. He inquires after the new baby. He plans to ride out to the countryside to repair his health and later reports feeling stronger. He lists the conditions of those among their acquaintances.
Dates: 1793 October 13-14

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 August 21

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush announces that a violent "fever" has broken out in one district of the city, where 12 people have died. If it spreads he plans to have Julia remain at Princeton. He then reports that influenza continues to spread, with violent symptoms that cause him anxiety. He adds that Mr. Wolstonecraft has refused to purchase their property, because he could not support himself by hunting on it. Finally, he notes the arrival of a fellow physician's son from France, who brings disturbing news of the...
Dates: 1793 August 21

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 3

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush records that his case load is increasing, as is his fatigue, but that many of those he treats are out of danger. He reports on the progress of the epidemic in their neighborhood.
Dates: 1793 September 3

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 5

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush writes that he has seen 100 patients, and that he now saves almost all those he sees within the first day. He notes that some doctors rail against the cure he uses, several of them publishing false information, even though they generally have not visited patients with the fever. He chronicles the fate of several doctors that have contracted the disease. He notes that some of his friends are ashamed to see him once they fall ill. He admonishes her once more to watch the boys closely for...
Dates: 1793 September 5

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 6-7

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush notes that his cure is working, but there is a pause in new cases, and that fatalities are now among the poor without access to doctors or respectable people being treated by quacks. He states that if the fever breaks out in Princeton, he will send his assistant John Cox to execute his cure. Once again he documents the health status of his fellow physicians, although he records a rumor that some doctors have ceased seeing patients at all. He then discusses the various treatments that have...
Dates: 1793 September 6-7

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 8

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush tells Julia that the pause is over; he has been called to countless cases. Two more doctors are ill, Dr. Morris has died, and Secretary Hamilton is sick. He describes the support he receives from friends, along with the more serious symptoms of the fever.
Dates: 1793 September 8

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Julia Stockton Rush (Princeton [N.J.]), 1793 September 10

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 16
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush expresses amazement that he remains uninfected by the fever, for he has seen over 100 patients on this date, and 40 people were buried. He states that he does not forget to treat the poor "remembering my dream in the Autumn of 1780." Many doctors have adopted his treatment, but several oppose it, as they oppose his treatment for lockjaw. He remarks that more of the French exiles have come down with the fever. He is now using bloodletting as a tool, since the weather is cooler.
Dates: 1793 September 10