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Mental illness -- Treatment -- United States -- History -- 19th century

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 4 Collections and/or Records:

Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers

 Collection
Identifier: RL.11044
Overview The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from...
Dates: Majority of material found within 1766-1845 and undated

Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia) letter to Richard Henderson (Loudon Court House, Virginia), 1810 June 27

 Item — Box 2: Series 1, Folder: 4
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Rush writes a more detailed letter regarding Mr. Carter's debts and ill treatment of Carter, who was insane, by his family. Includes a statement of charges certified by the hospital's steward. Letter features an additional written comment made by Henderson or someone in his firm.
Dates: 1810 June 27

Timothy Pickering (Salem [Mass.]) letter to Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia), 1807 July 5

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 14
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Pickering details how the family is no longer able to care for William. He has decided to send William to Rush's hospital in Philadelphia, where he will not be able to escape and might recover. He adds that another son, George, is potentially manifesting the same symptoms as William.
Dates: 1807 July 5

Timothy Pickering (Washington [D.C.]) letter to Benjamin Rush (Philadelphia), 1804 November 17

 Item — Box 1: Series 1, Folder: 14
Identifier: 1
Scope and Contents Pickering writes regarding his plans for caring for his mentally disturbed son, William, thanking Dr. Rush for his advice. In a postscript, he asks Rush if he should talk to his son about his derangement when he is rational in order to have his cooperation in effecting a cure.
Dates: 1804 November 17